Connect with us

Breaking News

Coronavirus: ‘I am shutting the world out to protect myself’


Sport

Coronavirus: ‘I am shutting the world out to protect myself’

Image copyright Scott Breslin Image caption Mr Breslin’s life was transformed after he was the victim of a random knife attack in 2001. Scott Breslin has become apprehensive about leaving his bedroom since Covid-19 forced the country into lockdown.The student is paralysed from the neck down and feels like a prisoner in his Glasgow home.For…

Coronavirus: ‘I am shutting the world out to protect myself’

Scott BreslinImage copyright
Scott Breslin

Image caption

Mr Breslin’s life was transformed after he was the victim of a random knife attack in 2001.

Scott Breslin has become apprehensive about leaving his bedroom since Covid-19 forced the country into lockdown.

The student is paralysed from the neck down and feels like a prisoner in his Glasgow home.

For the last seven weeks Mr Breslin, 35, has been shielded from his family and has only had personal contact with his 24-hour care team.

He said: “I am just trying to shut the world out to protect myself. I’m in my own wee bubble.”

Mr Breslin told BBC Scotland the pandemic has caused him heightened anxiety.

He said: “As soon as I start talking about coronavirus I get knots in my stomach. It affects your eating and your sleeping as well.

“There is a fear of leaving my room, just in case.”

‘Safety zone’

Before the restrictions were introduced Mr Breslin visited his father Mark, who lives 100 yards away, every day and they watched Countdown together.

He was also training to be a counsellor and had an active social life.

Now he only gets up for a few hours on alternate days and returns to his “safety zone” about 15:00.

But despite his new routine, which he compares to the movie Groundhog Day, he is wary of the restrictions being eased too soon.

Mr Breslin said: “I would rather they remained in place than more people dying.

“The second wave of Spanish flu wiped out more than the first. You are supposed to learn from your mistakes, not repeat them.

“I would rather be safe and alive than outside and dead.”

Image copyright
Scott Breslin

Image caption

Mr Breslin, who has to be strapped into his wheelchair, next to a poster for the post-apocalyptic horror film, 28 Weeks Later

Mr Breslin was only 16 when he was stabbed on his way home from a party in the city’s Cardonald area in the summer of 2001.

The unprovoked attack severed his spinal cord and left him unable to move his arms or legs.

He later worked with the Scottish Violence Reduction Unit to highlight the devastating impact of knife crime.

Before lockdown three carers worked daily shifts in his flat in Penilee, where he has lived for the last 14 years.

But to minimise the risk of infection one now stays overnight and wears full personal protective equipment (PPE) to cover a 24-hour period.

He said: “They are there just to be my hands, legs and everything I need to survive.

“My care team has been great and they have been the ones who have kept me going through all this. The only thing that has come out positive is how much they have supported me.

“It would be a choice of this or going into a care home and I don’t fancy being in one of them the now.”

‘Feels like prison’

Despite initial shortages of hand sanitizer Mr Breslin said his care team has not experienced any issues obtaining PPE.

The Scottish Independent Living Fund has also provided extra funding so they can get taxis instead of using public transport.

For shopping he relies on his sister and food packages.

Mr Breslin received a shielding letter from the Scottish government, which told him to stay indoors for 12 weeks.

He said: “That’s when my release date is. It feels like I am in a prison.

“It is just surreal. It is kind of like we are living in a movie. You are watching stuff on the TV but nothing is happening outside.”

Mr Breslin’s father is also shielding, as he suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD).

Netflix

And he said not seeing his loved ones and missing occasions, such as his niece’s birthday, is the hardest thing to come to terms with.

Mr Breslin stays connected on WhatsApp and Facebook, enjoys listening to Radio X and is grateful for online streaming services.

He said: “Money Heist is probably the best thing I have watched recently. That’s really good.

“If this happened 20 years ago we would not have these phones, the internet and Netflix. We would be stuck watching our five channels.”

Another positive is that he is eating more fruit and vegetables and no takeaway food.

Mr Breslin added: “That’s the only thing I can really do, to be honest. I can’t go out a jog or anything like that.

“I am quite limited because of my lack of movement.”

Hospital visit

The student has only left the house once since 23 March, to attend an essential appointment at the Southern General’s spinal unit.

Mr Breslin put on a mask and visor before before driven to the hospital and admits he was so anxious throughout the whole experience that he went straight to his room when he got home.

Looking ahead he is worried about the lockdown being eased too soon and fears the public are now not taking it as seriously as they should.

Did You See This CB Softwares?

37 SOFTWARE TOOLS... FOR $27!?

Join Affiliate Bots Right Away

He said: “I see people stopping in the street talking to each other and I want to shout ‘social distancing’ out the window.”

Mr Breslin plans to resume his studies in Glasgow when it is safe to do so.

But, unlike many at the moment, he is optimistic about his future job prospects as a drugs and alcohol counsellor.

He joked: “There will be plenty of work after this.”

Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

To Top